Re: Namewee releasing new album

An honest response to two comments made in my previous post.

To chinese educated & TheDude:

have you even read the translation of his lyrics?? He repeatedly saying he LOVE HIS COUNTRY (i believe you’re english-ed so shame on you) …

I know the lyrics very well, so you are making false accusations on my claim.

he made Msians realized just how important freedom of speech is when it’s taken away …

While it’s not the most intelligent of songs, you can’t deny the truth carried in the lyrics …

I do not deny that he is brave to point out all of Malaysia’s flaws. I do not deny that he is courageous to channel a wake-up call to citizens of Malaysia. Most important of all, I do not deny SOME parts of the truth in which he has so artistically announced in his song.

STILL, I think it is unnecessary to incorporate the national anthem in his rap. Having said that, it is not because rap has a negative connotation. In my humble opinion, a national anthem is an anthem. If one cannot sing it with patriotism, then he/she can just opt not to sing it.

But at the very least, do respect it. Respect does not require patriotism in your heart. It’s just like holding respect for your elders or other religions. Do you need another shower of emotion to respect them? Or is it because they hold an insurmountable value in life?

Our national anthem is a joke by itself. It’s not even an original tune.

It is true that the current national anthem is not the original tune. The 1957 national anthem was the original Negaraku. It was switched to a marching rhythm in 1992. However, national anthems are not Hollywood Pop/Rap/R&B songs. Even though it was not 1957 original, “Negaraku” has been in the hearts of Malaysians from all walks of life for so long; even though I dreaded the long mornings at school where we have to listen to teacher’s speeches, and sing the national anthem every Monday … I still stood respectfully to it. I may not sing it all the time, but I respect it. That is the honest bearings of youth. We are rebellious, and we stand up for what’s right. But few hold true to the importance of life virtues. Few can apply it in life when we are facing all sorts of idiocracy from the government, the world, and the universe.

National symbols such as flags, anthems, and monuments, are to be treasured and respected. Most Malaysians may not have that same sense of patriotism in their hearts, and that’s just too bad as we can never pass on our national heritage this way. Hence, I just think that this rap came along to exacerbate the situation.

Patriotism in Malaysian hearts barely exist anymore even among the bumis themselves.

What supporting truth do you have behind this statement? Did you interview every single bumi in this country and work up the statistics?

I believe Name Wee is trying to right the wrongs the right way, by starting with public awareness.

Perhaps, he is. He may or may not have done a good job. Again, IMHO … it won’t last long. We Malaysian Youths are so easily excited by new things. Yes, we are tired of some aspects in M’sia. Then again, a lot of us don’t realize how powerful the media and marketing world is.

My stand remains that Namewee is disrespectful towards his own country’s national heritage. It is not even a revolutionary idea. It does not carry significance. All that was done: a shrill alarm that wakes us up for only for 8 seconds, and a stamp profiling M’sia as the laughing stock of the world.

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12 Comments

  1. I can’t understand these “chinese-ed” guys? what’s so shameful about being english-ed? and is there still such a thing called english-ed in M’sia. Shouldn’t it be BM-ed?

    Reply

  2. “The 1957 national anthem was the original Negaraku.It was switched to a marching rhythm in 1992.”

    When I said Negaraku wasn’t an original tune, I wasn’t talking about 2007 Negaraku not being original. I was talking about the entire score of notes in which Negaraku was written. It’s not even about the rhythm. It’s the tune that has been copied. You play the piano, you know what tune is. Perhaps you need to check this out ==> http://youtube.com/watch?v=JPcNnHEsFM0

    “What supporting truth do you have behind this statement? Did you interview every single bumi in this country and work up the statistics?”

    I do not have any statistical data published by any reliable source to support the fact that patriotism is falling out of bumis themselves. I don’t need to (besides, statistics are not hatched out of interviewing an entire population, but only a portion, hence the usage of a sample size). While I have not interviewed every single bumi in this country, I have spoken to a fair number of bumis whom I know regarding their devoted love, support, and their will to defend this country and all its interests unconditionally. The lack of patriotism among the bumis I know is proof enough for me that there exists a good number of bumis who wouldn’t die for their country. Clearly, this isn’t substantial evidence for a debate.

    We’re in a time where the battles we have to fight are on the economic front. The government has provided the necessary arms and armour the bumis need for this form of warfare. Still, they’re not fighting this war which our country very much needs to win. Instead, a good number of them are selling off their arms and armour to the “less privileged” to fight it for them. Would we like to then call these avaricious sods patriots?

    I do agree though that this rap did come along to exacerbate the situation.
    The shrill alarm wakes us up for 8 seconds, just enough time to reach out for the alarm clock, look at the time, and put it on snooze. It’s sad though to know that the next time the alarm goes off, we’re only going to wake up for just another 8 seconds.

    Reply

  3. (sorry for flooding your comment box)
    I just wanna say that I had no intentions of offending you with any of the words I left behind and I’m truly sorry if I have.

    Reply

  4. boringest:
    You’ve got a point there 😉

    TheDude:
    Oh, no not at all. It is an interesting discussion because we both have two different views. I appreciate your time and opinion on this. I just decided to make it a post because … I would have flooded my own comment box!

    Reply

  5. lol – didn’t mr. ooi (OMG I remember this from primary 3!!!) tell you that negaraku was once prince george’s (as in george of georgetown penang fame) favourite song? Apparently it’s hawaiian, and I know this because there’s recently been some gossip about it. There was an indonesian version that became a very popular indon/malay pop song. Then it was some state’s national anthem, and then it became Negaraku as we know it.

    I actually don’t really understand the stigmatisation of pop-ing or rapping a national anthem. On the other hand I don’t really agree with adding lyrics that, whilst giving one’s opinion, as such, opinion that breed further division of the races. :X In any other song maybe it wouldn’t have been so bad, but doing it in Negaraku is good press isn’t it?

    Reply

  6. Hallo! Whatever this song stir up is still up to us to made do with what we have or maybe we can all do what we r suppost to do cum this erection! Afterall remember if we don’t help ourself who is there to save us? BTW tq for dropping at my site! Have a nice day!

    Reply

  7. Perhaps Namewee is a prankster.

    So he wants to make money and fame from his prank. Well, he certainly is not the first to do so…

    Check this out:
    http://mahagraha.wordpress.com/2007/09/07/some-bloggers-war-on-malaysian-govt/

    and this too:
    http://mahagraha.wordpress.com/2007/09/07/the-chasers-war-on-apec/

    I think the relevant question here is: to what extent do people can joke about the national anthem?

    So….What are the boundaries between a joke/prank and lack of patriotism?

    I’m afraid I don’t have the answers….

    Reply

  8. jiko:

    Err … ???

    Me don’t remember if he ever said that 😛 But seriously, is it orginally hawaiian?

    Well, from my perspective … even if national anthems change their course of tune through time … I would expect them to still take on a march or a anthem-like rhythm. Turning it into a rap or pop song defeats its purpose. It is not unique. All pop and rap songs are brought into the commercial world for fame and popularity. We don’t need to garner that kind of effect on a national anthem, be it boring or “un-cool”.

    It’s definitely good press for Namewee. Look at him now … he’s popular! For a guy like that to break into the industry, perhaps he wanted to stir something up to make everyone aware of his capability? It’s posibble. I’m not saying it is wrong considering you need talent or (more often) luck to suceed in the performing arts industry.

    Horny Ang Moh:
    There’s always a balance right … in my simple mind, I think of it as just another attention-seeker.

    mahagraha:

    Thanks for dropping by and featuring my article in your post.

    Freedom of speech is often a grey area. And you’re right, we may not have the right answer. But there is always a limit on what you can do. If everyone is free to speak and do whatever they wish … there will be no order in this world. Freedom of speech is something that garners trust. It is a two-way communication tool that needs both parties to set guidelines on what can be broadcast. It is the ideal part … but we do not live in this kind of reality.

    Namewee is just intelligent and courageous enough to seek attention this way. But also silly enough to not understand that he is making his country the laughing stock of the world too. He could have figured it all out, I’ll never know his true intentions. I guess the answer lies in what you believe as a citizen of Malaysia.

    Reply

  9. zewt:

    Hopefully I am able to clarify my opinion that was written.

    All I am saying is that you don’t have to incorporate the national anthem in the rap. I’m all for doing it through mass media productions! If we feature blogs on TV. To the world news. Or whatever. If we can sing a song to channel our dissatisfaction, sure. But in a song … what is the point of incorporating the Negaraku lyrics? If he was really brave enough, he would have incorporated all the names of the VIP’s, the PM, and whoever that’s shaking their legs in the government …

    But an anthem is a representation of our country. I am saying that we should respect it. If you want to disrespect the VIPs … the PM … the government …. sure. But the anthem is our national heritage. Why smear its innocence? While I agree that Namewee has a creative mind and talent … to be able to utilize the Negaraku in his debut … I personally do not support his album because of the clear reasons that I have stated above.

    Reply

  10. Mr Wee steal the intellectual property “Nagaraku” from Malaysia in his “monkey rap” for money making commercial purposes,he most probably should be sued under our copy right law rather than ISA which is way out of line, obviously our racist politicians got a mentality of a dictatorship
    rather than a free country.

    Reply

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